Rafting the Rogue River

Rafting the Rogue River of Southern Oregon is one of the American West’s premier adventures.     Trips can be as casual as a short afternoon float on tame sections to thrilling several day adventures along the “Wild and Scenic” section of the Rogue River with several rapids up to Class IV+.     This area is particularly well suited for inflatable kayaks of various sizes.

For Rogue River Fishing Guides click to the Rogue River Guides Association

For a printable guide to rafting the Rogue River, click to the BLM Website or see our HTML version of the BLM Float Guide below.

The premier rafting trips of the region generally involve a “put in” just outside of the wild and scenic section followed by rafting and 1-2 nights on the river either camping or staying in wilderness lodges which are strategically located along the river in parts not accessible to regular car traffic.

 

Rafting the Rogue River

 

[EDITING in PROGRESS]

Mule Creek Canyon, 22.9 miles downriver from Grave Creek, is
a dramatically narrow stretch of river with outstanding scenery and
challenging turbulence. Two large boulders (called the “Horns” or
“Jaws”) located in the right half of the river, are genuine “wrap-rocks”
that mark the entrance to the canyon. Beyond these guardian rocks is a
series of three sweeping turns, taking you right, left, and right again. A
nasty “eater” hydraulic named “Telfer’s Rock,” covers the left half of
the river as the canyon constricts again. Some 100 yards downstream,
another severe constriction occurs at the “Narrows” and necessitates
some maneuvering. Another 250 yards downstream brings you to
the “Coffeepot,” named for the effects of deep turbulence surging
upward in a conined space, as in a percolator. Water here is very
unpredictable, as is the amount of time you may be forced to circulate
in this coninement. Upon exiting the “Coffeepot,” you will experience
calm water until you reach Blossom Bar. Mule Creek Canyon, 22.9 miles downriver from Grave Creek, is
a dramatically narrow stretch of river with outstanding scenery and
challenging turbulence. Two large boulders (called the “Horns” or
“Jaws”) located in the right half of the river, are genuine “wrap-rocks”
that mark the entrance to the canyon. Beyond these guardian rocks is a
series of three sweeping turns, taking you right, left, and right again. A
nasty “eater” hydraulic named “Telfer’s Rock,” covers the left half of
the river as the canyon constricts again. Some 100 yards downstream,
another severe constriction occurs at the “Narrows” and necessitates
some maneuvering. Another 250 yards downstream brings you to
the “Coffeepot,” named for the effects of deep turbulence surging
upward in a conined space, as in a percolator. Water here is very
unpredictable, as is the amount of time you may be forced to circulate
in this coninement. Upon exiting the “Coffeepot,” you will experience
calm water until you reach Blossom Bar.
Photographer John Craig
The Coffeepot in Mule Creek Canyon, 1,710 cfs at Grants Pass, July 2003

Mule Creek Canyon, 22.9 miles downriver from Grave Creek, is
a dramatically narrow stretch of river with outstanding scenery and
challenging turbulence. Two large boulders (called the “Horns” or
“Jaws”) located in the right half of the river, are genuine “wrap-rocks”
that mark the entrance to the canyon. Beyond these guardian rocks is a
series of three sweeping turns, taking you right, left, and right again. A
nasty “eater” hydraulic named “Telfer’s Rock,” covers the left half of
the river as the canyon constricts again. Some 100 yards downstream,
another severe constriction occurs at the “Narrows” and necessitates
some maneuvering. Another 250 yards downstream brings you to
the “Coffeepot,” named for the effects of deep turbulence surging
upward in a conined space, as in a percolator. Water here is very
unpredictable, as is the amount of time you may be forced to circulate
in this coninement. Upon exiting the “Coffeepot,” you will experience
calm water until you reach Blossom Bar.